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World News!
« on: August 16, 2014, 09:28:09 PM »
I really feel like people need to be informed on, what's happening in this world!

To start this topic off, we will talk about two things!

The situation in Palestine
And
Cops and America built on racism!

1. The situation in Palestine (Free Palestine)

Many Palestinians and Israelis foresaw another round of conflict on the Israel-Gaza front this summer. They depict a kind of inevitability to it all, that speaks of a fatalism about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Some Israelis even hold to the view that they can sustain the status quo in both the West Bank and Gaza through a combination of containment and periodic resort to force, while mouthing the rhetoric of a two-state solution sometime in the future.

Yet the situation in the region as a whole should give them pause. The regional order that has more or less prevailed for decades is fast unravelling and new forces are emerging that cannot be contained in the way that the Palestinians have been since the 1948 war in which most of them became refugees and the state of Israel was established.

The configuration of Arab states that came into being at the end of the First World War has experienced relative stability on the basis of a system designed by Frenchman Georges Picot and his British counterpart, Mark Sykes, (the Sykes-Picot Agreement) in May 1916. They paved the way for the British mandates in Palestine and Iraq and the French mandate in Syria-Lebanon that endured until 1948. Thereafter, maintenance of the lines drawn on the map by the British and French has required a level of enforcement and dictatorial rule at odds with the ideals of self-determination and democracy. And the fate of the Palestinians today derives from their relative weakness in the successive struggles for power that have characterised the Middle East since 1916.

The enduring Israeli-Palestinian conflict is, in a sense, unfinished business from that era and it might have remained so, in relative isolation, but for the fact that in 2003 the Americans and British thought that by intervening in Iraq they could remake the regional system for the better. Instead, they opened Pandora's box, to quote former Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak, and now the whole system is in flux.

From 1948 to 1967, when Israel captured land from the surrounding Arab states, including the Gaza Strip and the West Bank, the Palestinian problem was depicted as one of refugees, not self-determination. Resort to guerrilla warfare and terror tactics by the Palestinians from the 1960s drew attention to their cause, but it was not until the first Palestinian intifada of 1987 to 1993 that the idea of self-determination for those living in the West Bank and Gaza, potentially leading to a Palestinian state alongside Israel, really gained traction.

Meanwhile, the cause of Arab nationalism suffered such a blow in the defeats of Egypt, Syria and Jordan in 1967 that the Palestinians could no longer look to the Arab states to solve their problem. In the place of Arab nationalism, the phenomenon of revisionist Islamist movements emerged as a new challenge to the regional order. Post-revolutionary Iran identified with these movements, sponsoring Hezbollah in Lebanon and supporting Hamas in the Gaza Strip. These developments, the collapse of the Oslo peace process in the second Palestinian intifada in 2000, and then 9/11 combined to produce a new narrative on the Palestinians that depicted them as part of the general problem of terrorism besetting the region and beyond.

The unravelling of Sykes-Picot has much to do with the rise of jihadi groups at the forefront of the terrorist challenge in the region. They gained strength in the fallout from the invasion and occupation of Iraq. Then came the Arab uprisings that brought down governments in Tunisia, Egypt, Yemen and Libya and fighting between government forces and rebels, aided by jihadis, in Syria.

Since 2011 the rising toll of death and destruction in Syria, the flight of millions of Syrian refugees to neighbouring countries and the divisive policies of the Shia-dominated government in Baghdad have led commentators to depict a region riven more by sectarian animosities than the Arab-Israeli conflict.

Another shift has taken place at the international level, with the Americans no longer able to exercise decisive influence in the region overall. In their opposition to the Assad regime in Syria, the Americans were at one with their long-standing Arab ally Saudi Arabia, but they upset the Saudis by not doing more to bring him down. This omission was not the only source of aggravation to the Saudis who have come to question the commitment of the Americans to their erstwhile friends in the region. They were aghast when the Americans did nothing to prevent the fall of Mubarak in Egypt and watched in consternation as the Muslim Brotherhood came to power there.

The Brotherhood's stance on regional issues represents a direct challenge to the Saudi monarchy. And therein lies a contradiction to the depiction of a region embroiled in sectarian conflict. Both the Saudis and the Muslim Brotherhood are Sunni Muslims. Their rivalry is about political power, not simply sectarianism.

When President Morsi was ousted last summer, the Saudis were delighted. President Abdel Fatah Al-Sisi is as opposed as the Saudis to the Muslim Brotherhood and, by extension, its offshoot, the Palestinian Hamas movement that presides in the Gaza Strip. Hamas has been embattled ever since. Meanwhile, Obama's decision to pursue a negotiated solution to the Iranian nuclear issue, capitalising on the election of President Rohani as successor to the abrasive Ahmadinejad, alienated the Saudis afresh while also alarming Israel.

As if these twists and turns were not already complicated enough, recent developments in Syria and Iraq, specifically the advances made by Isis (the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant) and its declaration of a new Islamic caliphate across captured territory in both states, represent a further unravelling of the regional order.

It is in this context that the latest round of conflict on the Israeli-Palestinian front cannot be dismissed as a sideshow. If the durability and legitimacy of the post-First World War regional system is up for grabs, both the Israelis and the Americans will be hard pressed to contain Palestinian resistance to Israel for another decade in the name of a moribund depiction of regional stability. The Palestinians represent but one of several communities in the region for whom a remaking of the 20th-century regional order may not be unwelcome. However, their main defenders in the region are more anti-Israel than they are pro-Palestinian and if Israel and its friends want to stem the trend toward Islamist extremism in the region they would do well to find a resolution of the Palestinian problem through a two-state solution than leave it to fate.

2. Why Cops are based on racism! (I have my hands up, I'm unarmed)

FERGUSON, Mo. (AP) Police and about 200 protesters clashed again in Ferguson, Missouri late Friday after another tense day in the St. Louis suburb that included authorities identifying the officer who fatally shot an unarmed black teenager and releasing documents alleging the young man had been suspected of stealing a $48.99 box of cigars from a convenience store in a "strong-arm" robbery shortly before he was killed.

Several hundred people congregated on a busy Ferguson street Friday night as protests continued nearly a week after 18-year-old Michael Brown was shot and killed by a police officer. It was peaceful until about midnight, when a large crowd broke into the convenience mart that Brown allegedly robbed the day he was killed.

Missouri State Highway Patrol Captain Ron Johnson said some in the crowd began throwing rocks and other objects at police. Police used tear gas to disburse the crowd but no arrests were made. One officer was hurt, but information on his injuries was not immediately available. No protesters were hurt.

Police Chief Thomas Jackson earlier Friday said the officer who shot Brown did not know the teen was a robbery suspect at the time of the shooting and stopped Brown and a companion "because they were walking down the middle of the street blocking traffic."

Darren Wilson, a 28-year-old white officer, has patrolled suburban St. Louis for six years and had no previous complaints filed against him, Jackson said.

Brown's relatives said no robbery would justify shooting the teen after he put his hands up. Family attorneys said Brown's parents were blindsided by the allegations and the release of a surveillance video from the store.

"It appears to be him," attorney Daryl Parks said, referring to the footage, which he said was released without any advance notice from police.

The police chief described Wilson as "a gentle, quiet man" who had been "an excellent officer." He has been on the Ferguson force for four years and served prior to that in the neighboring community of Jennings.

Wilson, who was placed on administrative leave after the Aug. 9 shooting, "never intended for any of this to happen," Jackson said.

According to police reports released Friday, authorities received a 911 call at 11:51 a.m. on the day of the shooting reporting a robbery at the Ferguson Market. An unidentified officer was dispatched to the store, arriving within three minutes. The officer interviewed an employee and customer, who gave a description of a man who stole the cigars and walked off with another man toward a QuikTrip store.

Descriptions of the suspect were broadcast over the police radio. The officer did not find the suspects either on the street or at the QuikTrip, the reports said.

The robber took a box of Swisher Sweets, a brand of small, inexpensive cigars. The suspects were identified as 18-year-old Michael Brown and 22-year-old Dorian Johnson, according to the reports.

Separately, Wilson had been responding to a nearby call involving a sick 2-month child from 11:48 am until noon, when he left that place. A minute later, he encountered Brown walking down Canfield Drive. The documents contained no description of what happened between Brown and Wilson.

Johnson has told reporters that the officer ordered the pair to move onto the sidewalk, then grabbed his friend's neck and tried to pull him into the car before brandishing his weapon and firing. He said Brown started to run and the officer pursued him, firing multiple times.

Another family attorney, Benjamin Crump, noted that police did not release a photo of the officer but released images from the security video that they say show Brown grabbing a man inside the store. Crump said he had not seen the photos.

Police "are choosing to disseminate information that is very strategic to try to help them justify the execution-style" killing, said Crump, who also represented the family of Trayvon Martin, the teenager fatally shot by a Florida neighborhood watch organizer who was later acquitted of murder.

The Aug. 9 video appears to show a man wearing a ball cap, shorts and white T-shirt grabbing a much shorter man by his shirt near the store's door. A police report alleges that Brown grabbed the man who had come from behind the store counter and "forcefully pushed him back" into a display rack.

Police said they found evidence of the stolen merchandise on Brown's body. Authorities determined that Johnson was not involved in the robbery and will not seek charges against him, Jackson said.

Brown's uncle, Bernard Ewing, said the shooting was unnecessary, even if his nephew was a robbery suspect.

A robbery "still doesn't justify shooting him when he puts his hands up," he added. "You still don't shoot him in the face."

Brown's death ignited four days of clashes with furious protesters. The tension eased Thursday after the governor turned oversight of the protests over to the Missouri Highway Patrol. Gone were the police in riot gear and armored vehicles, replaced by the new patrol commander who personally walked through the streets with demonstrators.

On Friday night, the Rev. Jesse Jackson linked arms with protesters as they marched to the site where Brown was killed. Jackson bent over in front of a memorial cross and candle and sighed deeply. He urged people to "turn pain into power" and to "fight back, but not self-destruct" through violence.

The scene was eclectic Friday night as hundreds gathered for a sixth straight evening. A man on a bullhorn called for a revolution. A young man waved a Bible while citing scripture. Some took selfies in front of a convenience store that had been burned by looters Sunday. Boys tossed a football, and horns and loud music blared. At a nearby shopping center, about 100 police cars were on hand.

To Vida Weekly, 51, it was still a somber occasion. She walked through the crowd holding high a sign that read: "The police killed Michael Brown and now they are trying to kill his character."

U.S. Rep. William Lacy Clay, a Democrat from St. Louis, took a bullhorn and spoke to people gathered at the QuickTrip.

"They have attempted to taint the entire investigation," Clay said to a cheering crowd. "They are trying to influence a jury pool by the stunt they pulled today.

Also Friday, the Justice Department confirmed in a statement that FBI agents had conducted several interviews with witnesses as part of a civil-rights investigation into Brown's death. In the days ahead, the agents planned to canvass the neighborhood where the shooting happened, seeking more information, the statement said.

Police have said Brown was shot after an officer encountered him and another man on the street during a routine patrol. They say one of the men pushed the officer into his squad car, then physically assaulted him in the vehicle and struggled with the officer over the officer's weapon. At least one shot was fired inside the car before the struggle spilled onto the street.
« Last Edit: August 16, 2014, 09:29:49 PM by InJuStIc Gaming »
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Agykoo

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Re: World News!
« Reply #1 on: August 16, 2014, 09:41:33 PM »
theres a reason the other thread was delted.

in before "da red baron" deltes this one too ^_^ (hugs to da red baron) ^_^

edit: if you want to talk about such things, I suggest you join fight club, also known as the adult discussion board. ^_^ you can join by asking BoB I think.

please go there so I can rip you in half for your false information, thank you ^_^
« Last Edit: August 16, 2014, 09:43:30 PM by Agykoo »
My point has finally been made ^_^ (viva la Agy!)

anywho

Under construction ^_^! (probably something spring/Doom Bee related XD) ^_^

Shorts the Environmentalist

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Re: World News!
« Reply #2 on: August 16, 2014, 10:15:38 PM »
theres a reason the other thread was delted.

in before "da red baron" deltes this one too ^_^ (hugs to da red baron) ^_^

edit: if you want to talk about such things, I suggest you join fight club, also known as the adult discussion board. ^_^ you can join by asking BoB I think.

please go there so I can rip you in half for your false information, thank you ^_^
why was the other one deleted? I didn't know this! XD

Agy pm me please? or is this something bob wants secretive
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Agykoo

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Re: World News!
« Reply #3 on: August 16, 2014, 10:19:31 PM »
why was the other one deleted? I didn't know this! XD

Agy pm me please? or is this something bob wants secretive

na criag removed it and that's all. if we want to talk about these things we need to use the adult section ^_^
My point has finally been made ^_^ (viva la Agy!)

anywho

Under construction ^_^! (probably something spring/Doom Bee related XD) ^_^

Gary

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Re: World News!
« Reply #4 on: August 17, 2014, 04:06:14 AM »
Hm. Interesting that you have decided to generalize cops as being racist. You know that there are, in fact, police officers who are of every ethnicity imaginable.

Are these cops somehow racist too?

If not, then why is it assumed that all white cops are racist? What exactly differentiates white cops from black cops other than the color of their skin? And why would that have any effect on whether or not they are racist?

You posted a tragic event, yes, but making generalizations of a group of people is essentially what you are doing by declaring all cops as racists. And in doing so you throw yourself under the bus, because racists are people who make generalizations of a group of people.


               

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Re: World News!
« Reply #5 on: August 17, 2014, 12:07:27 PM »
Hm. Interesting that you have decided to generalize cops as being racist. You know that there are, in fact, police officers who are of every ethnicity imaginable.

Are these cops somehow racist too?

If not, then why is it assumed that all white cops are racist? What exactly differentiates white cops from black cops other than the color of their skin? And why would that have any effect on whether or not they are racist?

You posted a tragic event, yes, but making generalizations of a group of people is essentially what you are doing by declaring all cops as racists. And in doing so you throw yourself under the bus, because racists are people who make generalizations of a group of people.
not all, but quite a few are racist. And yes there are cops of every ethnicity but ethnicity % white cops dominate the police force substantially.
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Agykoo

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Re: World News!
« Reply #6 on: August 17, 2014, 06:29:39 PM »
not all, but quite a few are racist. And yes there are cops of every ethnicity but ethnicity % white cops dominate the police force substantially.

and if that reason happens to be because blacks statictickly commit far more cirmes then white so there unelaabel to become cops, aswell as in the black community its tabo to be a cop.

does that still mean cops are a white job because whites keep them out? or are there other reason that have nothing to do with racisium ^_^
My point has finally been made ^_^ (viva la Agy!)

anywho

Under construction ^_^! (probably something spring/Doom Bee related XD) ^_^

Agykoo

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Re: World News!
« Reply #7 on: August 17, 2014, 06:40:03 PM »
I really feel like people need to be informed on, what's happening in this world!

To start this topic off, we will talk about two things!

The situation in Palestine
And
Cops and America built on racism!

1. The situation in Palestine (Free Palestine)

Many Palestinians and Israelis foresaw another round of conflict on the Israel-Gaza front this summer. They depict a kind of inevitability to it all, that speaks of a fatalism about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Some Israelis even hold to the view that they can sustain the status quo in both the West Bank and Gaza through a combination of containment and periodic resort to force, while mouthing the rhetoric of a two-state solution sometime in the future.

Yet the situation in the region as a whole should give them pause. The regional order that has more or less prevailed for decades is fast unravelling and new forces are emerging that cannot be contained in the way that the Palestinians have been since the 1948 war in which most of them became refugees and the state of Israel was established.

The configuration of Arab states that came into being at the end of the First World War has experienced relative stability on the basis of a system designed by Frenchman Georges Picot and his British counterpart, Mark Sykes, (the Sykes-Picot Agreement) in May 1916. They paved the way for the British mandates in Palestine and Iraq and the French mandate in Syria-Lebanon that endured until 1948. Thereafter, maintenance of the lines drawn on the map by the British and French has required a level of enforcement and dictatorial rule at odds with the ideals of self-determination and democracy. And the fate of the Palestinians today derives from their relative weakness in the successive struggles for power that have characterised the Middle East since 1916.

The enduring Israeli-Palestinian conflict is, in a sense, unfinished business from that era and it might have remained so, in relative isolation, but for the fact that in 2003 the Americans and British thought that by intervening in Iraq they could remake the regional system for the better. Instead, they opened Pandora's box, to quote former Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak, and now the whole system is in flux.

From 1948 to 1967, when Israel captured land from the surrounding Arab states, including the Gaza Strip and the West Bank, the Palestinian problem was depicted as one of refugees, not self-determination. Resort to guerrilla warfare and terror tactics by the Palestinians from the 1960s drew attention to their cause, but it was not until the first Palestinian intifada of 1987 to 1993 that the idea of self-determination for those living in the West Bank and Gaza, potentially leading to a Palestinian state alongside Israel, really gained traction.

Meanwhile, the cause of Arab nationalism suffered such a blow in the defeats of Egypt, Syria and Jordan in 1967 that the Palestinians could no longer look to the Arab states to solve their problem. In the place of Arab nationalism, the phenomenon of revisionist Islamist movements emerged as a new challenge to the regional order. Post-revolutionary Iran identified with these movements, sponsoring Hezbollah in Lebanon and supporting Hamas in the Gaza Strip. These developments, the collapse of the Oslo peace process in the second Palestinian intifada in 2000, and then 9/11 combined to produce a new narrative on the Palestinians that depicted them as part of the general problem of terrorism besetting the region and beyond.

The unravelling of Sykes-Picot has much to do with the rise of jihadi groups at the forefront of the terrorist challenge in the region. They gained strength in the fallout from the invasion and occupation of Iraq. Then came the Arab uprisings that brought down governments in Tunisia, Egypt, Yemen and Libya and fighting between government forces and rebels, aided by jihadis, in Syria.

Since 2011 the rising toll of death and destruction in Syria, the flight of millions of Syrian refugees to neighbouring countries and the divisive policies of the Shia-dominated government in Baghdad have led commentators to depict a region riven more by sectarian animosities than the Arab-Israeli conflict.

Another shift has taken place at the international level, with the Americans no longer able to exercise decisive influence in the region overall. In their opposition to the Assad regime in Syria, the Americans were at one with their long-standing Arab ally Saudi Arabia, but they upset the Saudis by not doing more to bring him down. This omission was not the only source of aggravation to the Saudis who have come to question the commitment of the Americans to their erstwhile friends in the region. They were aghast when the Americans did nothing to prevent the fall of Mubarak in Egypt and watched in consternation as the Muslim Brotherhood came to power there.

The Brotherhood's stance on regional issues represents a direct challenge to the Saudi monarchy. And therein lies a contradiction to the depiction of a region embroiled in sectarian conflict. Both the Saudis and the Muslim Brotherhood are Sunni Muslims. Their rivalry is about political power, not simply sectarianism.

When President Morsi was ousted last summer, the Saudis were delighted. President Abdel Fatah Al-Sisi is as opposed as the Saudis to the Muslim Brotherhood and, by extension, its offshoot, the Palestinian Hamas movement that presides in the Gaza Strip. Hamas has been embattled ever since. Meanwhile, Obama's decision to pursue a negotiated solution to the Iranian nuclear issue, capitalising on the election of President Rohani as successor to the abrasive Ahmadinejad, alienated the Saudis afresh while also alarming Israel.

As if these twists and turns were not already complicated enough, recent developments in Syria and Iraq, specifically the advances made by Isis (the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant) and its declaration of a new Islamic caliphate across captured territory in both states, represent a further unravelling of the regional order.

It is in this context that the latest round of conflict on the Israeli-Palestinian front cannot be dismissed as a sideshow. If the durability and legitimacy of the post-First World War regional system is up for grabs, both the Israelis and the Americans will be hard pressed to contain Palestinian resistance to Israel for another decade in the name of a moribund depiction of regional stability. The Palestinians represent but one of several communities in the region for whom a remaking of the 20th-century regional order may not be unwelcome. However, their main defenders in the region are more anti-Israel than they are pro-Palestinian and if Israel and its friends want to stem the trend toward Islamist extremism in the region they would do well to find a resolution of the Palestinian problem through a two-state solution than leave it to fate.

2. Why Cops are based on racism! (I have my hands up, I'm unarmed)

FERGUSON, Mo. (AP) Police and about 200 protesters clashed again in Ferguson, Missouri late Friday after another tense day in the St. Louis suburb that included authorities identifying the officer who fatally shot an unarmed black teenager and releasing documents alleging the young man had been suspected of stealing a $48.99 box of cigars from a convenience store in a "strong-arm" robbery shortly before he was killed.

Several hundred people congregated on a busy Ferguson street Friday night as protests continued nearly a week after 18-year-old Michael Brown was shot and killed by a police officer. It was peaceful until about midnight, when a large crowd broke into the convenience mart that Brown allegedly robbed the day he was killed.

Missouri State Highway Patrol Captain Ron Johnson said some in the crowd began throwing rocks and other objects at police. Police used tear gas to disburse the crowd but no arrests were made. One officer was hurt, but information on his injuries was not immediately available. No protesters were hurt.

Police Chief Thomas Jackson earlier Friday said the officer who shot Brown did not know the teen was a robbery suspect at the time of the shooting and stopped Brown and a companion "because they were walking down the middle of the street blocking traffic."

Darren Wilson, a 28-year-old white officer, has patrolled suburban St. Louis for six years and had no previous complaints filed against him, Jackson said.

Brown's relatives said no robbery would justify shooting the teen after he put his hands up. Family attorneys said Brown's parents were blindsided by the allegations and the release of a surveillance video from the store.

"It appears to be him," attorney Daryl Parks said, referring to the footage, which he said was released without any advance notice from police.

The police chief described Wilson as "a gentle, quiet man" who had been "an excellent officer." He has been on the Ferguson force for four years and served prior to that in the neighboring community of Jennings.

Wilson, who was placed on administrative leave after the Aug. 9 shooting, "never intended for any of this to happen," Jackson said.

According to police reports released Friday, authorities received a 911 call at 11:51 a.m. on the day of the shooting reporting a robbery at the Ferguson Market. An unidentified officer was dispatched to the store, arriving within three minutes. The officer interviewed an employee and customer, who gave a description of a man who stole the cigars and walked off with another man toward a QuikTrip store.

Descriptions of the suspect were broadcast over the police radio. The officer did not find the suspects either on the street or at the QuikTrip, the reports said.

The robber took a box of Swisher Sweets, a brand of small, inexpensive cigars. The suspects were identified as 18-year-old Michael Brown and 22-year-old Dorian Johnson, according to the reports.

Separately, Wilson had been responding to a nearby call involving a sick 2-month child from 11:48 am until noon, when he left that place. A minute later, he encountered Brown walking down Canfield Drive. The documents contained no description of what happened between Brown and Wilson.

Johnson has told reporters that the officer ordered the pair to move onto the sidewalk, then grabbed his friend's neck and tried to pull him into the car before brandishing his weapon and firing. He said Brown started to run and the officer pursued him, firing multiple times.

Another family attorney, Benjamin Crump, noted that police did not release a photo of the officer but released images from the security video that they say show Brown grabbing a man inside the store. Crump said he had not seen the photos.

Police "are choosing to disseminate information that is very strategic to try to help them justify the execution-style" killing, said Crump, who also represented the family of Trayvon Martin, the teenager fatally shot by a Florida neighborhood watch organizer who was later acquitted of murder.

The Aug. 9 video appears to show a man wearing a ball cap, shorts and white T-shirt grabbing a much shorter man by his shirt near the store's door. A police report alleges that Brown grabbed the man who had come from behind the store counter and "forcefully pushed him back" into a display rack.

Police said they found evidence of the stolen merchandise on Brown's body. Authorities determined that Johnson was not involved in the robbery and will not seek charges against him, Jackson said.

Brown's uncle, Bernard Ewing, said the shooting was unnecessary, even if his nephew was a robbery suspect.

A robbery "still doesn't justify shooting him when he puts his hands up," he added. "You still don't shoot him in the face."

Brown's death ignited four days of clashes with furious protesters. The tension eased Thursday after the governor turned oversight of the protests over to the Missouri Highway Patrol. Gone were the police in riot gear and armored vehicles, replaced by the new patrol commander who personally walked through the streets with demonstrators.

On Friday night, the Rev. Jesse Jackson linked arms with protesters as they marched to the site where Brown was killed. Jackson bent over in front of a memorial cross and candle and sighed deeply. He urged people to "turn pain into power" and to "fight back, but not self-destruct" through violence.

The scene was eclectic Friday night as hundreds gathered for a sixth straight evening. A man on a bullhorn called for a revolution. A young man waved a Bible while citing scripture. Some took selfies in front of a convenience store that had been burned by looters Sunday. Boys tossed a football, and horns and loud music blared. At a nearby shopping center, about 100 police cars were on hand.

To Vida Weekly, 51, it was still a somber occasion. She walked through the crowd holding high a sign that read: "The police killed Michael Brown and now they are trying to kill his character."

U.S. Rep. William Lacy Clay, a Democrat from St. Louis, took a bullhorn and spoke to people gathered at the QuickTrip.

"They have attempted to taint the entire investigation," Clay said to a cheering crowd. "They are trying to influence a jury pool by the stunt they pulled today.

Also Friday, the Justice Department confirmed in a statement that FBI agents had conducted several interviews with witnesses as part of a civil-rights investigation into Brown's death. In the days ahead, the agents planned to canvass the neighborhood where the shooting happened, seeking more information, the statement said.

Police have said Brown was shot after an officer encountered him and another man on the street during a routine patrol. They say one of the men pushed the officer into his squad car, then physically assaulted him in the vehicle and struggled with the officer over the officer's weapon. At least one shot was fired inside the car before the struggle spilled onto the street.

for your first one


for yoru 2nd one. not a suspect, hes on camera voinlty assaulting the store owner.

like wise the guy was shot because he assaulted the officer and went for his gun. the shot while arms up thing comes from unverified sources as of yet.
so instead of morning the guy who was killed (who was a fellion now form the robbery) they go out and roit and loot. further pressing the stero type, of blacks not beign able to handle them selfs. even the state police that where brought in had to suit up in roit gear and use tear gas as the blacks there were using molativoe coctails on them.

let the investigation play out, if the cop is guilty, then hes going to jail for life. if not guilty then eveyr single person throwing blame on the cops is a moron for jumping to conclusions.

ether way the oriting and looting is not helping blacks at all.


My point has finally been made ^_^ (viva la Agy!)

anywho

Under construction ^_^! (probably something spring/Doom Bee related XD) ^_^

Gary

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Re: World News!
« Reply #8 on: August 17, 2014, 06:55:12 PM »
not all, but quite a few are racist. And yes there are cops of every ethnicity but ethnicity % white cops dominate the police force substantially.

How do you know that "quite a few are racist"? Have you personally spoken to every police officer in the US? No, of course you havent.

You have no clue how many cops out there are racist, and how many arent. You simply assume that because there are more white cops then black cops, there are a lot of racist white tangerines on the police force. That is, in and of itself, racism.


               

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Re: World News!
« Reply #9 on: August 17, 2014, 07:46:52 PM »
How do you know that "quite a few are racist"? Have you personally spoken to every police officer in the US? No, of course you havent.

You have no clue how many cops out there are racist, and how many arent. You simply assume that because there are more white cops then black cops, there are a lot of racist white tangerines on the police force. That is, in and of itself, racism.
whoa okay no need to get nasty, "Quite a few" doesn't mean all the police and I'm just taking a simple estimate from what I've seen. Also, I'm taking a good estimate on there being more white cops than black cops considering the US population in diversity shows White, or Caucasians, is the largest ethnicity. 
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